Weekly Feature



2015-02-04 / Local News

North Tonawanda History Museum completes new exhibit


The North Tonawanda History Museum has completed a new exhibit on Richard Newman in the Art Heritage Exhibit Hall. The North Tonawanda History Museum has completed a new exhibit on Richard Newman in the Art Heritage Exhibit Hall. A new exhibit on artist Richard Newman is on display in the Art Heritage Exhibit Hall at the North Tonawanda History Museum.

Newman, who was born in North Tonawanda in 1938, moved away to pursue his career. He lived at 301 Falconer before he left the area in the mid-1950s.

Newman was a student of Edward A. Parske at North Tonawanda High School, where he graduated in 1956. He donated photos of many of his works of art to the History Museum for the exhibit.

The photographs that are not on the wall are in the exhibit area below the exhibit. The exhibit to the right of the Richard Newman exhibit is about Parske.

The History Museum has exhibits in the Art Heritage Exhibit Hall on the careers and work of Robert Mangold and Len Rusin, who, like Newman, were students of Parske’s at North Tonawanda High School.

All are supporters of the North Tonawanda History Museum.

Parske’s daughter, Gail Parske Bille, who created the painting of her father gardening in the exhibit, and her husband Dan Bille, former historian for the City of Tonawanda, are life members of the History Museum. Dan Bille is an ex-officio trustee and a member of the History Museum’s Advisory Committee.

Newman said his preference as an artist is to work in a manner that blurs media boundaries. He said collage, assemblage sculpture and digital imagery from mixed sources are studio methods that trigger his creative instincts.

“Each of these expressive forms offer me the opportunity to construct a context for the interplay of polarities,” he said.

Newman added, “This process helps me to integrate many layers of my experience and to resolve contrary ideas and feelings. Conceptually my work draws upon many sources such as comparative mythology, Jungian psychology, primitive and folk art traditions.”

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