Weekly Feature



2015-12-09 / Editorial

Out of the Past


LADIES MAN — Radio heartthrob Bing Crosby, a day before his 29th birthday, took a break from a week of concerts at Buffalo’s Paramount Theater to drop in on “the ladies of the Wheel Chair Home in Kenmore,” as the Buffalo Times caption put it, on May 2, 1932. In honor of the upcoming Mother’s Day, he arrived with a box of chocolates and serenaded the ladies with “My Wild Irish Rose.” 
From the collection of theTonawanda-Kenmore HistoricalSociety LADIES MAN — Radio heartthrob Bing Crosby, a day before his 29th birthday, took a break from a week of concerts at Buffalo’s Paramount Theater to drop in on “the ladies of the Wheel Chair Home in Kenmore,” as the Buffalo Times caption put it, on May 2, 1932. In honor of the upcoming Mother’s Day, he arrived with a box of chocolates and serenaded the ladies with “My Wild Irish Rose.” From the collection of theTonawanda-Kenmore HistoricalSociety 25 Years Ago Dec. 12, 1990

The Town of Tonawanda is getting into the real estate business as they plan to sell what is commonly known as the “Mud Flats” for what could be another development along the lines of Fire Tower Industrial Park. The board discussed plans at its work session to sell the nearly 90-acre parcel for development by a private party. The North Youngmann Commerce Center, as the lot has been labeled by the Town of Tonawanda Development Corporation, could be the source of between $35 and $40 million in development and nearly 1,500 jobs over the next few years, according to Councilman Carl Calabrese.

Space, the final frontier, is the exclusive domain of highly skilled astronauts and others who have taken rigorous training programs to qualify for space flight. For the layman, experiencing space is highly unlikely. So Doug Smith, a fifth-grade teacher at Glendale Elementary school in the Town of Tonawanda, did the next best thing by way of a radio hook-up. Smith and his students talked to the orbiting crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia this past Saturday morning.

Supervisors and highway superintendents from Erie County towns agreed Friday to accept the county’s offer of a $1,300 per lane mile reimbursement for clearing snow from county roads. The county had been reimbursing towns $1,100 per lane mile for snowplowing. County Executive Dennis T. Gorski, in his proposed 1991 county budget, raised the figure to $1,175 per lane mile. Municipal officials expressed their displeasure with that figure, since the county receives $2,280 per lane mile from the state for plowing state highways.

(Do you have a memory of the Ken-Ton area you would like to share with Bee readers? Send it to “Out of the Past,” Ken-Ton Bee, 5564 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14221.)

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