Weekly Feature



2017-05-17 / Editorial

Out of the Past


THEY GOT GAME — The Kenmore High School — there was only one at the time — girls’ basketball team is shown in 1924. 
From the collection of the Tonawanda-Kenmore Historical Society THEY GOT GAME — The Kenmore High School — there was only one at the time — girls’ basketball team is shown in 1924. From the collection of the Tonawanda-Kenmore Historical Society 25 Years Ago May 20, 1992

Residents of the area near the controversial Buffalo Telephone/Cellular One phone tower on Niagara Falls Boulevard expect to make their presence known en masse at the May 21 meeting of the Zoning Board of Appeals. Michael King, whose Fountain Park home abuts the tower in the lot of Kenilworth Electronics, 860 Niagara Falls Blvd., said if everything goes as planned, there will be more people than can be seated in the council chambers of the municipal building for the 7 p.m. meeting. “We’ll be going door-to-door and calling people and handing out fliers to get people to come to the meeting,” King said. “We’ll also be telling them to call their councilmen and telling them what we want.”

As the flags begin to fly on Delaware Avenue in Kenmore each spring, where they will stay until after Labor Day, you know it’s time for the annual Memorial Day Parade. For the ninth year in a row, that means William Rowe has been very busy. “The parade just gets my adrenaline flowing,” Rowe said. “Seeing the parade and all the people along the street brings out the kid in me,” he said. Rowe needs all of his energy. The Linden Avenue resident got involved with the parade as a commander of the Milton J. Brounshidle Post 205 of the American Legion in 1983-84. His experience in the Color Guard and love for parades, along with his ability and desire to continue, set him into a pattern of leadership in the coordination of the annual event. There is a lot of time involved in the preparations, Rowe explained.

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