Weekly Feature



2017-07-12 / Editorial

Out of the Past


A DEADLY EXPLOSION — Explosions at the Lucidol Division of Novadel-Agene Inc. Plant on Military Road in the Town of Tonawanda on Sept. 23, 1953, killed 11 people, destroyed the building and damaged homes in the Sheridan-Parkside neighborhood. A newspaper account of the incident said the explosion could be felt four miles away. 
From the collection of the Tonawanda-Kenmore Historical Society A DEADLY EXPLOSION — Explosions at the Lucidol Division of Novadel-Agene Inc. Plant on Military Road in the Town of Tonawanda on Sept. 23, 1953, killed 11 people, destroyed the building and damaged homes in the Sheridan-Parkside neighborhood. A newspaper account of the incident said the explosion could be felt four miles away. From the collection of the Tonawanda-Kenmore Historical Society 25 Years Ago July 15, 1992

Plans are in the works for a $250,000 expansion to the two-year-old Town of Tonawanda Aquatic and Fitness Center, which town officials say will be completed in time for the facility to host a portion of the 1993 World University Games. The 2,500-square-feet addition would include space for aerobics classes, increased room for fitness equipment and an area designated for babysitting. The town board adopted a bond resolution for the project, subject to a permissive referendum, at Monday’s regular meeting. Gary Lane, director of the town’s parks and recreation department, brought the issue before the town board at its work session Monday afternoon.

Two controversial building permits were revoked Thursday by the Town of Tonawanda Zoning Board of Appeals after citizen groups protested uncharacteristic structures in their neighborhoods. Permits for the microwave transmission tower erected by Cellular One-Buffalo Telephone on Niagara Falls Boulevard and for the sign on the lawn of the Kenmore United Church of Christ on Delaware Road at Danbury Lane were both revoked in 3-2 votes of the board. Each result brought mixed reactions from the people involved. Outside the meeting, the elation of Michael and Donna King, the Fountain Park residents who led the fight against the phone tower, was contrasted by church members who felt their sign was singled out among many other similar markers in the town.

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