Weekly Feature



2018-01-10 / Editorial

Out of the Past


MOSTLY WELTERWEIGHTS — The 1951 Kenmore Senior High School boxing team lines up for a yearbook photo. At center are N. Byer, adviser Dr. Charles Marlak and F. Brown. From left are R. Myers, D. Byer, R. Brandt, H. Lawrence, A. Morrison, A. Dixon, W. Duffy, D. O’Brien, C. Callaman, H. Holmberg, W. Sharp, W. O’Brien, D. Grey and R. Aikin. 
From the collectionof the Tonawanda-Kenmore Historical Society MOSTLY WELTERWEIGHTS — The 1951 Kenmore Senior High School boxing team lines up for a yearbook photo. At center are N. Byer, adviser Dr. Charles Marlak and F. Brown. From left are R. Myers, D. Byer, R. Brandt, H. Lawrence, A. Morrison, A. Dixon, W. Duffy, D. O’Brien, C. Callaman, H. Holmberg, W. Sharp, W. O’Brien, D. Grey and R. Aikin. From the collectionof the Tonawanda-Kenmore Historical Society 24 Years Ago Jan. 20, 1993

Plans are in the works for a 20,000-seat amphitheater to be built in the Town of Tonawanda that would serve as a major boon to the area’s cultural scene. Town Supervisor Carl J. Calabrese confirmed reports that Hal Kolker, a Western New York native who now heads a San Diego-based amphitheater development firm, is hoping to develop an outdoor theater in the town at an unnamed location. Calabrese would not divulge which sites were under consideration for development; however, one source said the site will likely be on the waterfront. “It’s not like we’re ready to break ground on this project, because the developer doesn’t own any property at this point,” Calabrese said. “We’re offering technical assistance at this time and hope to go from there.”

When Jack Farrell lost his eyesight 12 years ago, it meant the end of one career. It also meant the beginning of another. “Part of losing my sight, for good or for bad, was to start helping others,” he said. These days, Farrell devotes his time while at home on St. Johns Avenue in Tonawanda to two organizations with a long tradition of serving the blind and visually impaired. Indeed, Farrell said his volunteer activities keep him busier than a full-time job. He said that is fine with him. Farrell holds a seat on the Board of Directors of the Blind Association of Western New York and is also a member of the Kenmore Lions Club. “I’d need rubber wallpaper if I had to sit around the house all day,” he joked. Farrell said the two organizations work cooperatively and closely.

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