Weekly Feature



2018-02-14 / Editorial

Out of the Past


PLAY BALL — Tonawanda’s Western Electric Company plant was large enough to support a four-team softball league, and employee Alfred Brown of the “Spoilers” threw the first pitch of the 1958 season. The “Dukes” beat the “Spoilers,” 15-4, in the opening game. 
From the collection of the Tonawanda-KenmoreHistorical Society PLAY BALL — Tonawanda’s Western Electric Company plant was large enough to support a four-team softball league, and employee Alfred Brown of the “Spoilers” threw the first pitch of the 1958 season. The “Dukes” beat the “Spoilers,” 15-4, in the opening game. From the collection of the Tonawanda-KenmoreHistorical Society 25 Years Ago Feb. 24, 1993

While most schools have held special programs in Februaries past to recognize Black History Month, the staff and students at Herbert Hoover Elementary School in Tonawanda learned something different this year. Rather than approach the education from a strict African American perspective, the school went to the African source for its instruction this year. Two speakers from the New York International African Institute, a Buffalo-based organization, visited the Thorncliff Road school this month for a daylong presentation of African history and culture, complete with am exhibit of artifacts and materials native to the continent of Africa.

It’s not an easy topic to address. When Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is mentioned, along with the frightful statistical projections on its spread, people cringe. However, the fact remains that many people are woefully misinformed about AIDS and its precursor, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). With that in mind, Kelley Carson of the guidance department at Mount St. Mary Academy in Kenmore scheduled a program to help educate parents and encourage discussion among families about the disease. Two speakers, both HIV-positive, spoke to a group of parents last week in a casual setting before they return to the school on March 3 to address the girls at the Mount on this deadly disease. Both Ron Diehl and Rob Herrington of the Western New York AIDS Alliance spoke candidly about the disease.

The floor has cleared and this year’s political dance over Erie County’s 8 percent sales tax is done. Now there is movement to make sure the band doesn’t have to be struck up again next year.

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